Look, Learn, Live & Do You: The Squat Stance Cable V – Bar Chop w/ Tricep Extension

6.-Do-things-in-order.pngIn the past I have found difficulty in prioritizing certain isolation exercise and core movement. Historically, exercises that center on isolating a particular muscle group often appear towards the end of the workout. Take for instance, the bicep curl, calf raise or the triceps extension.  When It comes to anything in life, if you hold a good deal of value for it, make sure you start off with it.  You might reason then that a look at my exercise order suggests that the bicep curl, tricep extension hold little relative value compared to others such as the clean from the hang, the sled push or the weighted pull up.  You might be right in this assessment, but I like to believe that the value of an exercise is meaningless if it’s inappropriate for a given athlete, workout, or period of time.  Despite this focus, the reality of life is that we are always bounded by time.  Having little respect for time and you will find that the things that are placed last  are often forgotten or dismissed. Thus, efficiency is always an important component of program design when time is a limiting factor.

In this post, I will provide you with an exercise that helps improve training efficiency and adds value to exercises that are often considered valueless.

The Squat Stance Cable V – Bar Chop w/ Tricep Extension

The Squat Stance – Rotating – V Bar – Chop fits into several classes of exercise.  It is an exercise that challenges stability through rotation. It is also an exercise that challenges the body as a whole rather than in isolation. We can also view it as an integrative exercise or a movement that is challenged by the ability to integrate various parts and/or function to produce a desired objective. Additionally, the Squat Stance rotating cable Vbar chop is an exercise that challenges our ability to apply a horizontal impulse in to the ground.

There are several objectives in applying this exercise to a training program.  We are looking to combine simple exercises together for the purpose of improving efficiency and increase value by increasing objectives.  In this particular exercise there are three particular training objectives that are combined

  1. Objective 1: Demonstrating core control through the application of a resistive load along the transverse plane to the upper extremity as it relates to the lower extremity. – This is just another fancy way of saying this is a core exercise.
  2. Objective 2: Applying a resistive load to challenge elbow extension
  3. Objective 3: Applying a resistive force to a single limb that challenges both horizontal displacement and the integrity of hip abduction and
  4. Objective 4: Allowing resistive load to produce greater range and neural control in hip internal rotation.

Mastering these objectives will allow an individual to gain range in hip internal rotation, improve their ability to displace themselves horizontally, improve the strength, control and integrity of hip extension, abduction and flexion and provide help them facilitate a higher quality of communication between the upper extremities and the lower extremities. A detailed account of the muscles worked in this particular exercise is complex and difficult to quantify due to the number of structures that are involved  combined with the fact that the various individuals express movement differently due to the variances in their structures. It may be best to view this simply as multisgemental and complex movement that challenges the following among many.

  1. Internal and External Obliques,
  2. Rectus Abdominus
  3. Hip External Rotators
  4. Hip Abductions
  5. Grip Strength
  6. Support
  7. The start of the position immediately acts on the internal rotators of the hip. In particular the tensor fascia lata (TFL) and gluteus medius. The gluteus minimus is engaged the more we get the athlete to flex at the hip.
  8. Additionally, there is quite a bit of stress placed on structures involved in stability of the knee.

efficient1.jpgThe reasons why I like this particular exercise and the class of exercises like it is due to the fact that it drives efficiency.  With this particular exercise I can focus on developing strength through the upper body and stability of the lower body. I also like it because it is a widely recognize motion.  We are likely to have seen someone chop tree or swing a bat. Thus, the movement has a great reference and is therefore easier to teach than those exercises without reference.  This allows the exercise to be relatively easier to perform and thus widely applicable to various populations. Lastly, it is integrative  and movement based and can act as a great avenue in the transfer of strength gains to movement and therefore performance.

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